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Believe Me One SheetIMDbBelieve Me

2017 ♦ 6:46 ♦ produced by Lee Perna ♦ directed by William R. Coughlan

In this contemporary take on the classic fable “The Boy Who Cried Wolf,” a man finds himself bored with his job — and decides to amuse himself by playing pranks on his coworkers, only to find that they may be disinclined to believe him when their trust is most critical.

48 Hour Film ProjectDirector William R. Coughlan was joined by “The Greater Evil” producer Lee Perna and renowned L.A. screenwriter Barry Gribble on Tohubohu’s second 48 Hour Film Project entry in 2017 (just three weeks following our prior venture). “Believe Me,” a darkly comedic fable, was produced for the Richmond, Virginia, competition entirely over the weekend of July 14th through the 16th, 2017, and premiered at the Grace Street Theater on Saturday, July 22nd.

Believe Me — Original Trailer

TOHUBOHU PRODUCTIONS presents  a 48 HOUR FILM PROJECT  “BELIEVE ME”  starring BRIAN MAC IAN  JEAN HUDSON MILLER  KEITH WATERS  CAROL LAMPMAN McCAFFREY  BROOKS TEGLER  HUGH HILL  and ANNA COUGHLAN  edited by JASMINE ARMSTRONG  WILLIAM R. COUGHLAN  director of photography BJORN MUNSON  associate producers PAM W. COUGHLAN  MEREDITH SIMS  executive producers WILLIAM R. COUGHLAN  LEE PERNA  written by BARRY GRIBBLE  produced by LEE PERNA  directed by WILLIAM R. COUGHLAN

SAG-AFTRA

 

For “Believe Me,” our goal was simply to craft a darkly comedic, contemporary interpretation of a classic fable — in this case, “The Boy Who Cried Wolf.” In doing so, we made a clear distinction between the conventions of a fable versus those of a fairy tale — so no imaginary magical world or overt good-versus-evil conflict (both hallmarks of the fairy tale), and a clear “moral truth” conveyed by the story (and explicitly stated at the end). For example, during production we ended up changing the initially scripted “Once upon a time” opening — even though we knew audiences would likely be expecting it — as that wording is characteristic of fairy tales, not fables. And while we did put a humorous twist on the tale’s moral lesson, we did not set out to make an explicitly political film — though it was frequently interpreted as such. From the moment our actors read the script, up through the viewer reactions to the finished film, people noted explicit connections to the unfortunate current political climate — one in which flagrant lying is rewarded, even celebrated. So I suppose the moral of this story might be that whatever the intentions of the screenwriter (in this case, the extraordinarily talented Barry Gribble), or the creative guidance of the director, the ultimate interpretation of the finished work inevitably rests with the audience.

William R. Coughlan