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The Rest of Your Life One SheetIMDbThe Rest of Your Life

2017 ♦ 7:42 ♦ produced by Lee Perna ♦ directed by William R. Coughlan

Recent high school graduate Caleb is reluctant to embrace his friend Abby’s advice to embark on a new chapter of his life; he prefers the status quo. But his own perspective shifts radically when a sudden accident leaves him dead — and reanimated as a ghost. Guided by longtime spirit (and 1970s holdover) Paul, Caleb must acquaint himself with his newfound condition… and ultimately determine the course of his “unlife.”

48 Hour Film ProjectThe Greater Evil” producer Lee Perna and “Winston” writer Anna Coughlan joined director William R. Coughlan on Tohubohu’s 2017 48 Hour Film Project entry for Washington, DC, “The Rest of Your Life,” an unconventional coming-of-age film. The film was produced entirely over the weekend of June 24th through June 26th, 2017, and premiered at the AFI Silver Theatre on Thursday, July 13th.

The Rest of Your Life — Original Trailer

TOHUBOHU PRODUCTIONS presents  a 48 HOUR FILM PROJECT  “THE REST OF YOUR LIFE”  starring DYLAN GOTTLIEB  ERIN ROSE COUGHLAN  NELLO DeBLASIO  with ANNA COUGHLAN  KEITH WATERS  MARY EGAN  BRIAN MAC IAN  BROOKS TEGLER  CAROL LAMPMAN McCAFFREY  edited by WILLIAM R. COUGHLAN  BRAD HARTLAND  director of photography DAN FOSTER  music by BRIAN WILBUR GRUNDSTROM  featuring “THE LION’S HEAD” performed by ERIN ROSE COUGHLAN  co-producers ANNA COUGHLAN  PAM W. COUGHLAN  associate producer MEREDITH SIMS  executive producers WILLIAM R. COUGHLAN  LEE PERNA  written by ANNA COUGHLAN  produced by LEE PERNA  directed by WILLIAM R. COUGHLAN

SAG-AFTRA

 

“The Rest of Your Life” is probably the most explicitly personal film I’ve directed to date. While a coming-of-age story can take place at any number of times in a person’s life, there’s something about departing for college that feels like a most fundamental (and widely identifiable) transition, even under the most ordinary of circumstances. But while deep drama is naturally inherent in that transition, a short film (as opposed to a feature) might be a difficult avenue in which to really make that resonate. So for that abbreviated duration, we needed a readily-accessible “hook” — a metaphorical construct that both merited viewer interest and still spoke clearly to the struggle of moving on to a new stage of life, acknowledging the attendant fears of losing that which is comforting and familiar. In our initial take on the story, we leaned more heavily on the comedic and exaggerated elements. But as we fleshed things out (and even continuing into shooting), I realized that while we could still keep things comparatively light, we needed to embrace the underlying gravity that such a transition signifies. In the end — as my own daughter prepares to leave home — I hope the tonal combination succeeds.

William R. Coughlan