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Uncertainty Principle One SheetIMDbUncertainty Principle

2009 ♦ 7:19 ♦ produced by Pam W. Coughlan ♦ directed by William R. Coughlan

Dire warnings of immminent disaster have proven justified, as global destruction begins raining down from purple-hued skies. A Washington family struggles to cope with the advancing armageddon until a lone physicist proposes an unorthodox course of action.

48 Hour Film ProjectOn the strength of Tohubohu’s performance in the 2009 48 Hour Film Project, we were invited to participate in the 2009 International Shootout, along with 53 other teams from around the globe. Bringing back the core creative team from “Please Forward,” we produced “Uncertainty Principle” from December 4th through the 7th, 2009, structured around the required theme “the end of the world.”

Uncertainty Principle — Original Trailer

TOHUBOHU PRODUCTIONS presents  “UNCERTAINTY PRINCIPLE”  starring STUART SCOTTEN  JOHN C. BAILEY  LINDA GABRIEL DEUTSCH  BELÉN PIFEL  ANNA COUGHLAN  ERIN ROSE COUGHLAN  featuring DONALD F. BARNETT III  GABRIELLE L. HAYES  RICHARD FISKE  HEATHER WHITPAN  edited by BRAD HARTLAND  WILLIAM R. COUGHLAN  director of photography JESSE ACHTENBERG  music by BRIAN WILBUR GRUNDSTROM  executive producer WILLIAM R. COUGHLAN  written by ROBIN BRANDE  produced by PAM W. COUGHLAN  directed by WILLIAM R. COUGHLAN

 

“Uncertainty Principle” was a case of fortuitous timing — writer Robin Brande was in the midst of researching what would become the first novel in her Parallelogram series, and was keenly interested in applying that knowledge to a short film. As a lifelong science fiction fan (and a dabbler in the world of quantum mechanics), I was thrilled at the prospect. Both the nature of our shooting schedule (and the freezing temperatures during our December shoot) meant that we had to keep the scope small — but that forced us to focus on the real heart of the conflict. Ultimately, the film isn’t about world-ending cataclysm, but about how a divided family deals with crisis, and how authority doesn’t necessarily translate to trust. Of course, the physics portrayed in the film don’t come close to those of the real world, but that’s not the point — that’s just stage-setting. It’s all about taking a leap of faith; hence the choice of the ostensibly out-of-place (but deliberately chosen) “Amazing Grace” during the closing credits. Of course, having the weather clear enough for us to get some establishing shots (later enhanced by carefully selected visual effects) made our stage-setting that much more effective.

William R. Coughlan