Bombshell

2018 · 6:03 · written by Barry Gribble · produced by Lee Perna · directed by William R. Coughlan

Binjamen, irate after a conflict with a local sushi chef, decides to take revenge — in an extreme fashion. But when he meets the vacationing Lynette, he is instantly smitten... and has to reconsider his plans for vengeance when it seems she may be caught up in his actions.

The Tohubohu troupe returns to the 48 Hour Film Project entry for Washington, DC with “Bombshell,” a comedy about the dual absurdities of overreaction and instant infatuation. Written by “The Least Among Us” scribe Barry Gribble and produced by “The Greater Evil” producer Lee Perna, the film was created entirely over the weekend of May 4th through the 6th, 2018, and premiered at the AFI Silver Theatre on Saturday, May 29th.

TOHUBOHU PRODUCTIONS presents  a 48 HOUR FILM PROJECT  “BOMBSHELL”  starring EDWARD DANIELS  SCHUYLER ATKINS  NELLO DeBLASIO  ERIN ROSE COUGHLAN  edited by WILLIAM R. COUGHLAN  director of photography DAN FOSTER  music by BRIAN WILBUR GRUNDSTROM  associate producer MEREDITH SIMS  executive producers WILLIAM R. COUGHLAN  LEE PERNA  written by BARRY GRIBBLE  produced by LEE PERNA  directed by WILLIAM R. COUGHLAN
48 Hour Film Project IMDb

Bombshell — Original Trailer

Bombshell — Meet the Team

Bombshell — First Shot (360° Video)

In a conversation with François Truffaut, Alfred Hitchcock explained the difference between surprise and suspense, using the illustration of a bomb underneath a table. To paraphrase the master himself, if two people are having a conversation and a bomb suddenly goes off, then we as the filmic audience are clearly surprised. But if we first see the bomb — and its rapidly decreasing countdown timer — but the characters are oblivious to its existence, then we suddenly become intensely engaged in whatever innocuous conversation is going on: our keen awareness of the impending explosion generates suspense. For ‘Bombshell,’ we decided to play up that concept for comedic effect, both by having just one character aware of the bomb’s placement and by heightening the underlying absurdity of the premise. Hitchcock, of course, had one caveat to his explanation — that whatever happens, the bomb can never go off — but an answer as to whether or not we adhere to that mandate will require a viewing of the film itself.
— William R. Coughlan