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Schlimmer

2004 · 8:12 · written by Tohubohu · produced by Geoffrey long · directed by William R. Coughlan

Sebastian is eager to show off his latest acquisition to a cadre of eccentric — and soon-to-be-jealous — art collectors, even hiring his photographer nephew to capture the unveiling for posterity. But when the “Schlimmer” turns up missing, accusations of theft begin flying, and long-simmering resentments begin to undermine the group’s cohesion.

“Schlimmer” — a mystery — was made as part of the 48 Hour Film Project 2004. The entire piece was created over the weekend of May 7–9, 2004, and first screened at the AFI Silver Theatre on Friday, May 14.

TOHUBOHU PRODUCTIONS presents  “SCHLIMMER”  starring STUART SCOTTEN  SHAWN “FELT” FELTY  KORI A. LUSIGNAN  COURTNEY DAVIS  PAM W. COUGHLAN  music by SCOTT ANDREW LePERA  edited by GINNY FILER and WILLIAM R. COUGHLAN  director of photography WILLIAM R. COUGHLAN  co-producer KATE ERIN GIBSON  executive producers WILLIAM R. COUGHLAN  KORI LUSIGNAN  written by TOHUBOBU  produced by GEOFFREY LONG  directed by WILLIAM R. COUGHLAN
48 Hour Film Project IMDb
‘Schlimmer’ is one of those pieces about which my thoughts go from gushing praise to unrelenting criticism, depending on my mood. There was so much that went right with it, but also innumerable little problems along the way. In the interests of focusing on the positive, I will say that in terms of a learning and growing experience, we really couldn’t have asked for anything more. We put together a killer team, and really corrected some of the flatness-of-character issues that plagued ‘Loose Ends.’ Still, our lack of an organized writing process left us with an overdependence on manufactured conflict rather than truly advancing the plot via valuable character interaction. Editing wholly improvised dialogue into a consistent narrative proved far more complicated than I’d anticipated, but the immediacy of the delivery left me confident in the decision to work from an outline rather than a detailed script. I think the greatest takeaway from the experience was the realization that the mad-scramble weekend model was not only a viable way of producing a short, but actually a desirable one. With the demands of daily life as extensive as they are, it’s practically impossible to set aside much longer to work on something like this. Perhaps it’s a symptom of our instant-gratification culture, but when the alternative is the all-too-common practice of allowing a project to remain indefinitiely at the almost-but-not-quite-finished stage, it’s truly rewarding to be able to actually complete something.
— William R. Coughlan